I thought this was a librarians joke, but it’s not. A Field Guide to Getting Lost is… lost.

I thought this was a librarians joke, but it’s not. A Field Guide to Getting Lost is… lost.

Grandview Elementary School. Pittsburgh.
via 

Grandview Elementary School. Pittsburgh.

via 

thelastbillboard:

May 2013: Anthony Discenza

pgdigs:

April 25, 1979: PSO rocks the jailhouse

From time to time, we find photos in the Post-Gazette’s photo archive worthy of standing alone — and without much story. This image of Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra in the Allegheny County Jail) qualifies.

Pittsburgh Press photographer Michael Chikiris captured the scene and writer Eleanor Chute provided colorful details about how the inmates received it.

"The violin sounds pretty. I hope they come back here," inmate Harvey A. Broadus told her that day.

It’s unclear whether they ever did, but the photograph contains a scene for the ages. The full story, from April 26, can be seen above.

—Ethan Magoc

Junction Hollow

Junction Hollow

coolchicksfromhistory:

Google Doodle celebrating the birthday of marine biologist and conservationist Rachel Carson (1907-1964).  
Rachel began her career at the US Bureau of Fisheries before turning to nature writing.  Her fourth book, Silent Spring (1962), documented the effects of pesticides such as DDT on the environment.  The book inspired a grassroots movement to protect the environment that led to the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1970.  The EPA banned agricultural use of DDT in 1972.
In 1980, President Jimmy Carter posthumously awarded Rachel the Presidential Medal of Freedom, saying:

Never silent herself in the face of destructive trends, Rachel Carson fed a spring of awareness across America and beyond. A biologist with a gentle, clear voice, she welcomed her audiences to her love of the sea, while with an equally clear determined voice she warned Americans of the dangers human beings themselves pose for their own environment. Always concerned, always eloquent, she created a tide of environmental consciousness that has not ebbed.

coolchicksfromhistory:

Google Doodle celebrating the birthday of marine biologist and conservationist Rachel Carson (1907-1964).  

Rachel began her career at the US Bureau of Fisheries before turning to nature writing.  Her fourth book, Silent Spring (1962), documented the effects of pesticides such as DDT on the environment.  The book inspired a grassroots movement to protect the environment that led to the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1970.  The EPA banned agricultural use of DDT in 1972.

In 1980, President Jimmy Carter posthumously awarded Rachel the Presidential Medal of Freedom, saying:

Never silent herself in the face of destructive trends, Rachel Carson fed a spring of awareness across America and beyond. A biologist with a gentle, clear voice, she welcomed her audiences to her love of the sea, while with an equally clear determined voice she warned Americans of the dangers human beings themselves pose for their own environment. Always concerned, always eloquent, she created a tide of environmental consciousness that has not ebbed.

How to Freeze a Person and Bring Them Back to Life

Encino Man in PGH.

Pud Galvin of the Pittsburgh Burghers, a team of the short-lived Players’ League, was the first baseball player known to have used performance enhancing drugs, which back in those days was an elixir containing monkey testosterone. Also worth noting: nobody really cared that he used it. 
via

Pud Galvin of the Pittsburgh Burghers, a team of the short-lived Players’ League, was the first baseball player known to have used performance enhancing drugs, which back in those days was an elixir containing monkey testosterone. Also worth noting: nobody really cared that he used it.

via